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Why Mark Zuckerberg Turned Down Yahoo's $1 Billion Offer For Facebook

By Daniel Schmitz, Associate Partner & Mentorship Coach, Lighthouse International

Imagine if you put blood sweat, tears and all your money into your dream business for years and someone comes along and offers you a billion dollars!! What would you do?

Would you sell it or would you say: 'No!' and stick with it because you believe in its potential and in the vision of what's possible?

Well, this is exactly the question Mark Zuckerberg had to ask himself when he was offered $1 billion for Facebook by Yahoo in 2006! In a company board meeting about making the decision to sell, Mr Zuckerberg said:

"This is kind of a formality, just a quick board meeting, it shouldn't take more than 10 minutes. We're obviously not going to sell here."

His answer contains a powerful lesson and principle applicable to all areas of our lives!

He fully believed in his vision and he didn't want anyone else to take over his company and potentially even change it. His primary motive wasn't money, something else was driving him:

"I just thought we could do it!" Mr Zuckerberg said later on.

The second foundational principle of building a successful life is Personal Leadership. This means the clearer you are about your vision in life and the more you're aware of your values and what you stand for, the stronger your beliefs become and the easier it is to lead yourself!

With this in place, it is much more straight forward to make difficult decisions because you have something which guides you. This takes a lifetime of work but the foundation is built brick by brick, like a house. It's a powerful lesson we can learn from Mr Zuckerberg. How clear and compelling is your vision for your life?

Read more on this story at Business Insider...

To learn more about the importance of having a compelling vision, watch Steve Jobs talk about how fundamentally important it is here...

Virgin Money CEO On How Depression Made Her Stronger

By Jairaj Singh, Associate Partner, Lighthouse International

In a week when high-profile people like Prince Harry and singer Lady Gaga have openly been talking about their challenges with mental health, the Virgin Money CEO, Jayne-Anne Gadhia, gave a humbling interview with the BBC about her own struggles with depression. You may assume that a high profile CEO earning a large salary could have no problems, however, she talks about how after the birth of her daughter Amy in 2003, she became clinically depressed and felt "completely out of control":

"Ash [her husband] had given up his job and we had only me earning, a new mouth to feed and I remember feeling completely out of control because what I wanted to achieve - that is, packing up work and staying with my child - was unachievable. 

How on earth was I going to manage that? It was the first time that I'd ever, ever experienced what people described as depression.

I had always thought, despite the fact that my mum had suffered over the years with her own issues, that depression is something that was a bit weak-minded or something.

And when it hit me, I realised nothing could be further from the truth.

And when I read the Harry Potter books and saw the Dementors, that is how depression felt to me - that sort of a thing that comes into your life and sucks all of your energy out of it - and I just felt hopeless.

I didn't know where to go, I didn't know what to do, who to talk to and at that point, everybody expects you to be happy and thrilled."

After many months of suffering - at one point, Ms Gadhia was convinced her baby daughter was dead - she eventually went to the doctor for help:

"It was knowing what I was dealing with that helped me to deal with it," she said.

"I think if I'd have just gone on and not realised that I had a clinical problem and that depression wasn't something that you can just sort of push through, it would have been very different."

Ms Gadhia started working shorter hours, took exercise and put her life back into balance. The first year she changed the way she worked, Ms Gadhia received the highest bonus of her career!

This is an incredibly humbling story of someone who, on the surface has achieved a huge amount of success by "normal" standards. What it again shows us is that facing our problems and reaching out for help is the only way to resolve the internal challenges many of us face on a daily basis:

"I think we still have a culture of not talking about it. I don't want to get to a place where we've got everybody crying on each other's shoulders.

But I think finding a way for organisations to support staff that want to talk about the issues that they're going through and having [the] maturity of line management to know when that's required - to know where help can come - is really important."

Read the full interview at the BBC...

Click here for more advice and guidance on how successful people deal with depression...

BlackRock CEO Larry Fink Reveals His Top Two Leadership Influences

By James Mills, Associate Partner & Mentorship Coach, Lighthouse International

When you look closely at CEOs and other people in leadership positions, one thing that's very apparent is they are always on the look out for other people to learn from and be inspired by. Larry Fink, the CEO of BlackRock, who is responsible for managing an incredible $5.1 trillion worth of assets, has shared two of his biggest leadership influences in an interview with Bloomberg Markets. They are Lee Kuan Yew - the late founder of modern Singapore, and Phil Jackson - the basketball coach who has won the most NBA championships in history. It may come as a surprise that neither of these role models work in finance, so Mr Fink explained why he picked these two in particular:

"In 1965, Lee Kuan Yew took this mosquito-infested port that the English and then the Malays ravaged, and look at that society today—Singapore is really impressive.

The key to success in basketball is the organisation, not one individual. And winning in the NBA is all team. It is just as much defence as offence. It’s one thing to have some ­hedonistic phenoms who have this extraordinary year and win the ­championship. Jackson’s done it 11 times. To do that every year, rallying athletes to play as a team, to me that’s leadership."

What's clear is that he's admired the way that both of these leaders have been involved in building teams and even a whole society in a way that has enabled continued and ongoing success. He was drawn to learn from leaders who were more focussed on long-term success rather than those who only had short-term achievements. Larry Fink shows us that leadership is a universal human quality rather than one of technical expertise - which essentially means we can all learn from legends in any industry or profession!

You can read more about Larry Fink's views on leadership in his interview here. 

Click here to find out why the most successful people in the world go to other legends and mentors for advice and guidance to achieve their goals! 

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